Tim Player – The Bruised Proscenium and The Immaculate Rock Dog – (4/05/2017 – 27/05/2017)

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Please join us at 5.30pm on Thursday May 4th to celebrate the opening of Tim Player’s latest exhibition, The Bruised Proscenium and The Immaculate Rock Dog.

I used to think Ron Ashton was the coolest. I still do. He’s a rock dog in my book. I guess I aspire to being a rock dog. I don’t really know what a rock dog means to the world at large but I heard the term in an interview with a contemporary musician and it stuck in my head. This must have been about 9 months ago. I’ve used the term subsequently and reflected on this usage in moderately serious ways.

The interview was informative. It was not pompous. Nor was it overly polite and hence not boring. It didn’t make a big happy consensus family of the music-art scene which the interviewer and musician intended to address. Neither the musician nor the interviewer exceptionalised the subject of rock music and the contemporary ventures that the field tends to attract, both observing how connected music is with other kinds of art practices and the machinations of contemporary capitalism. As a piece of discursive knowledge, I’ve retained more from the interview in question than all the other chapters and essays I read that year.

The musician used the term rock dog with some critical tact, like a candid take on what goes on and how what’s going on isn’t always shredding and bad-arse, however much the authoritative idiom-manufacturers say it does, taking for granted that you agree. I guess to shred and be bad-arse it helps if certain contextual things are aligned, plugged in, at play. The slippery business of having the attitude and knowing how to shake it seemed implicit in the argument. Further, the rock dog knows intuitively the gains and loses that have come before, as too the systemic barbs of cliché. The rock dog doesn’t go in for staving off boredom as a simple end in itself, the rock dog’s moment is defined by how uniquely effective its disruption of boredom and predictability (as defining symptoms of the relative cultural bloc) are expressed and interpreted.

To shred and be bad arse and shake it and have the attitude are hard feats to own. Any performer who has rubbed up against the real world of the stage more than a couple of times will tell you this (“The stage will bruise you”). Importantly, the rock dog takes the right things seriously. They take risks. They lose it to regain it to lose it again. They tend not to suffer the kinds of duck-and-cover pretence employed in the pursuit of sustaining the spectacle of coy cool. Being forthright, I theorise, is a big part of being a rock dog.
– Tim Player

Tim Player is an artist and musician who lives in Dunedin where he performs frequently in groups including Opposite Sex and OV Pain.

Opens – Thursday 4 May, 5.30pm
(with refreshments provided by Liberty Brewing & live performance by Tim Player)
Hours – Tuesday – Saturday, 12.00pm – 4.00pm.
Closes – Saturday 27 May, 4.00pm.